“If you get uptight, the music’s going to sound like nothin’.”

Quincy Jones

“When I paint something I never forget it – it’s like a smell. I look at a sketch I did when I was eleven and I am immediately there. In my mind I froze that moment forever.”

Martin Tielli, interviewed at Canadian Design Resource

How great is this? Brad Mackay shares this exemplary specimen of Canadian-Hungarian cartoonist George Feyer’s unique stamp of approval:

George famously had a stamp made up with the words “Horse Shit” on them in a Gothic script. Whenever he disagreed with somebody who wrote to him out came the stamp. It was a reply that was simple, brusque and outrageous (given the era). 
I recently wrote a profile of Feyer for Canada’s History Magazine and during my research was lucky enough to come across a 1966 letter that he had applied his singular stamp to. I give it to you here as evidence of the power of Feyer’s fiendishly iconoclastic nature. What a guy. 

How great is this? Brad Mackay shares this exemplary specimen of Canadian-Hungarian cartoonist George Feyer’s unique stamp of approval:

George famously had a stamp made up with the words “Horse Shit” on them in a Gothic script. Whenever he disagreed with somebody who wrote to him out came the stamp. It was a reply that was simple, brusque and outrageous (given the era). 

I recently wrote a profile of Feyer for Canada’s History Magazine and during my research was lucky enough to come across a 1966 letter that he had applied his singular stamp to. I give it to you here as evidence of the power of Feyer’s fiendishly iconoclastic nature. What a guy. 

CHANNELER by Takashi Ohashi, abstract animation using Japanese and English typography and symbols.

Matthew Houston’s Phone Book is my favourite book from SPX.

 matthew-houston

Chris Ware and Seth at ELCAF 2014

An audience member asks Chris Ware why he’s always so critical of and down on his own work:

I look at it and I just always see the mistakes. There are many things that I could have done better. I really think it’s the duty of every artist to have the harshest eyes you could possibly have for your own work because it’s not just seen by you. The second you show it to more than one person that’s two consciousnesses times two.

Listen to Roz Chast on the Virtual Memories Podcast
She talks about writing her memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? and being overwhelmed by the process of writing a long book until her therapist recommended the simple solution of breaking it into chapters to provide a structure:

Since I had never done a long-form thing before, I thought it had to be all one big thing, and I couldn’t figure it out, because I knew I had these different stories to tell, and there were different parts, and then there were photographs. I had some vague sense of all these things, but I didn’t know how…

My favourite moment of the interview is at the 40:30 mark when, having been asked what makes her laugh, she cracks herself up talking about doing image searches for Tofurky.

Listen to Roz Chast on the Virtual Memories Podcast

She talks about writing her memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? and being overwhelmed by the process of writing a long book until her therapist recommended the simple solution of breaking it into chapters to provide a structure:

Since I had never done a long-form thing before, I thought it had to be all one big thing, and I couldn’t figure it out, because I knew I had these different stories to tell, and there were different parts, and then there were photographs. I had some vague sense of all these things, but I didn’t know how…

My favourite moment of the interview is at the 40:30 mark when, having been asked what makes her laugh, she cracks herself up talking about doing image searches for Tofurky.

Eleni Kalorkoti: “I’ve been keeping a brush pen sketchbook recently. This is the pie page.”

Eleni Kalorkoti: “I’ve been keeping a brush pen sketchbook recently. This is the pie page.”

Star Trek in Cinerama Widescreen

Nick Acosta stitched together scenes from Star Trek, in their original 4x3 aspect ratio, to see what the show would’ve looked like in widescreen format:

As a kid the show always felt bigger and more epic than it appears to me as an adult. I was able to create these shots by waiting for the camera to pan and then I stitched the separate shots together. The result is pretty epic. It reminds me of the classic science fiction movies of the 50’s and 60’s. Suddenly the show has a “Forbidden Planet” vibe.

Cartoon Brew shared this look at an early version of Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, and points out:

Mike Gabriel, who co-directed Pocahontas and production designed Wreck-It Ralph, apears as the live-action Eddie Valiant in some scenes. And some of the animation tests were created by a guy named Chris Buck, who co-directed a little-heard-of animated feature last year called Frozen.

That’s Paul “Pee-Wee Herman” Reubens as the original voice of Roger.

I’m looking forward to The Boxtrolls. I enjoyed this featurette on creating the stop motion world of the movie, especially the replication of natural elements like fire and water.

Richie Pope on “what brushes do you use?”

Richie Pope was asked, “what brushes do you use?” one too many times. His multi-tweet answer: