There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.
Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. […] When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.
…
I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.

There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.

Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. […] When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.

I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.